The Proactive Security Officer
Many officers look at their jobs as just a matter of following instructions. The officer will complete tasks that have been laid out for him or her in Post Orders and do what the supervisor assigns.However, responding to written instructions and verbal orders is just the beginning of a proactive security officer’s challenge.

Yes, Post Orders do specifically list your duties, and outline precisely when those specific tasks must be completed. Post Orders do list step by step operating procedures that you must follow exactly. Post Orders do list emergency procedures and contacts for the crisis situations you may encounter on the job. But Post Orders and verbal instructions only set the stage for job performance. What we need from each officer goes far beyond just following orders.

The professional security officer provides our client with a thinking, inquisitive observer who continuously scouts for problems about to happen. The professional officer is aware. He or she catches minor irregularities and Do not just think about the next step you are about to do next, think also — why am I taking this step? Question it; is there a better way of doing it? What should I find or learn next? Do not just think what you should be doing at 0300, also think: what might go wrong at 0300 when I make my rounds?

Anticipate problems before they become major security, safety or fire disasters.

Constantly ask yourself, what is not right? What can go wrong? What am I doing now that could be done better and more efficiently? How can this procedure be made easier to follow, yet at the same time, be more effective? Think what situations exist at this time, at this location, in this weather and what could cause problems on this particular post?

Try to find things that are not quite right. Windows that have been left open, doors that do not fully close, or lock, dark places along your patrol route that need lights but do not have them. Try to find conditions that if not corrected, will eventually lead to accidents or fires. Then, after you have found these little problems in waiting, investigate them and report them thoroughly and accurately to your supervisor. The supervisor in turn reports them to your branch manager so that the client can be approached with the sort of information and advice that enables him or her to do something about it before disaster strikes.

Make it your quest to find things before someone else finds them the hard way, before something happens that costs our client money he or she had not planned on spending. Everyone knows the old saying, “He didn’t close the barn door until after the horse got out.” In other words, precautions were not taken until after a disaster had struck. Your goal is to discover that open barn door – that potential security, safety or fire problem – and close it through proactive observation and reporting before disaster strikes; before the horse gets out.

The Proactive Security Officer plays a very important role in our Continuous Service Improvement Program. It is the security officer who is on the ground where the problems exist. It is you instructions. The officer will complete tasks that have been laid out for him or her in Post Orders and do what the supervisor assigns. However, responding to written instructions and verbal orders is just the beginning of a proactive security officer’s challenge. Yes, Post Orders do specifically list your duties, and outline precisely when those specific tasks must be completed. Post Orders do list step by step operating procedures that you must follow exactly. Post Orders do list emergency procedures and contacts for the crisis situations you may encounter on the job. But Post Orders and verbal instructions only set the stage for job performance. What we need from each officer goes far beyond just following orders. The professional security officer provides our client with a thinking, inquisitive observer who continuously scouts for problems about to happen.

The professional officer is aware. He or she catches minor irregularities and Do not just think about the next step you are about to do next, think also — why am I taking this step? Question it; is there a better way of doing it?What should I find or learn next? Do not just think what you should be doing at 0300, also think: what might go wrong at 0300 when I make my rounds? Anticipate problems before they become major security, safety or fire disasters. Constantly ask yourself, what is not right? What can go wrong? What am I doing now that could be done better and more efficiently? How can this procedure be made easier to follow, yet at the same time, be more effective? Think what situations exist at this time, at this location, in this weather and what could cause problems on this particular post? Try to find things that are not quite right. Windows that have been left open, doors that do not fully close, or lock, dark places along your patrol route that need lights but do not have them. Try to find conditions that if not corrected, will eventually lead to accidents or fires. Then, after you have found these little problems in waiting, investigate them and report them thoroughly and accurately to your supervisor. The supervisor in turn reports them to your branch manager so that the client can be approached with the sort of information and advice that enables him or her to do something about it before disaster strikes. Make it your quest to find things before someone else finds them the hard way, before something happens that costs our client money he or she had not planned on spending. Everyone knows the old saying, “He didn’t close the barn door until after the horse got out.” In other words, precautions were not taken until after a disaster had struck. Your goal is to discover that open barn door – that potential security, safety or fire problem – and close it through proactive observation and reporting before disaster strikes; before the horse gets out.

The Proactive Security Officer plays a very important role in our Continuous Service Improvement Program. It is the security officer who is on the ground where the problems exist. It is you who must report them for corrective action to be taken. It must be you who stays on top of the security, safety, and fire situations for the client you serve. It must be you who takes it on him or herself to demonstrate the initiative to aggressively, proactively be on the search for anything and everything that could cause our client’s security system to be breached. You must watch for anything that could create an accident on the business premises. Dedicate yourself to being that thinking proactive professional, that proud member of the Initial team. The one who is continuously alert for, checks out, and reports any situation that could be damaging to our client’s business success. The proactive officer is much more than just the operator of a security system. He or she is a thinking, responding, caring observer-reporter who our client must see as an invaluable part of his or her business success.




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